Shalane Freaking Flanagan

By now, most of you have probably heard about what happened at the NYC Marathon last weekend. I know we are a week out from the race but I couldn’t let this pass without writing something about it. Never have I felt so fired up about a race I didn’t even run. The running world LIT UP with Shalane Flanagan’s historic win. In case you missed it, it was the first time a US woman had won the TCS NYC Marathon in forty years. And it was freaking SHALANE FLANAGAN who won, arguably the most popular and well-recognized female marathoner in our sport right now.

Full disclosure: I wasn’t in New York to watch the marathon nor was I able to watch the whole thing online. I saw the start of the elite women and then I pretty much had to leave to go to work where I continued to stalk the event on social media. Even with all of these degrees of separation, I couldn’t help but get excited about what was happening on the streets of New York.

Shalane Flanagan | NYC Marathon

(Shalane’s Instagram)

A little context: Last winter, Shalane was training for the Boston Marathon and she ended up fracturing her back. Not a minor injury to say in the least. She had to drop out of Boston, a race she had been very open about wanting to win. I can only imagine how much that must have hurt, to have to set aside this major dream that she had been working so hard towards to focus on healing.

Fast forward to November 5th: By mile 20, the lead pack of women was down to three – Flanagan, Keitany and Daska. From there, Shalane was able to run away with it, running 5:08, 5:11 and 5:04 splits in her final miles. I would be grateful to be able to run that time in a mile race, much less at the end of a marathon. It was freaking incredible.

Shalane Flanagan

Pure emotion.

(Shalane’s Instagram)

So you might be wondering how in god’s name can I relate to this insanely fast professional runner? I have no hope of running a 2:26 marathon anytime in this lifetime. But honestly, it comes down to some of the statements she made in her post race interviews (and if you want an extra dose of emotion, watch the video of her interview) –

“I’ve dreamed of a moment like this since I was a little girl… It means a lot to me, to my family—and hopefully inspires the next generation of American women to just be patient. It took me seven years to do this. It took a lot of work for just this one moment…  About nine months ago I was heartbroken over not getting the opportunity to race the Boston Marathon… I just kept telling myself that there’s going to be delayed gratification and a moment down the road that would make up for it.”

Sometimes I find myself feeling a little frustrated about my race results. I’ve worked so hard in 2017 and I don’t feel like I currently have PRs that actually reflect my fitness. I had thought the Philly Marathon would be my break-through at least, that even if my half marathon PR had only dropped a mere minute, at least I would shave a huge chunk of time off my marathon this year. Well, you all know that that it clearly did not work out that way.

But then here is this incredible marathoner who has literally clawed her way back from a BROKEN BACK and just won the biggest marathon in the world talking about delayed gratification. And it just felt like she was talking to me and to every other injured runner out there.

This sport is hard. You pour so much of yourself into training and even if you are able to get through a cycle with no major injuries, it then all comes down to one day. You have to hope that the weather is on your side (cloudy and 40 degrees with no wind – is that too much to ask?!), that your stomach cooperates, that every other variable is just right. And more often than not, it doesn’t work out perfectly. So yeah, as runners we definitely need to become comfortable with the idea of delayed gratification.

2 Generations Running

Winter running is coming…

So while 2017 may not have been the year of PRs for me, I will still celebrate and hold my head high because my best races are still ahead of me. Here’s to delayed gratification.

Did you watch (or run) the NYC Marathon?

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